Sunday, May 21, 2017

[LINUX_Newbies] Caps Lock

 

The Caps Lock light will not come on when I press the Caps Lock button.
At first I thought it was a defective keyboard, but I have tried three
keyboards. The light will not come on on any of them, but they do when I
plug them into my laptop. After the test on my laptop, instead of
letting my new Dell Inspiron 3668 pc launch Ubuntu when it boots up, I
went into the setup screen (bios and other stuff) and the Caps Lock
light comes on there. So, it is not a problem with the new pc but,
instead, is a problem with Ubuntu. Is there a command in Ubuntu to
enable the Caps Lock light to come on, or is this one of the unknown
problems with using the newest version of amd64 server on an i3 machine?
Knowing if Caps Lock is on is important when entering passwords because
the Caps Lock key might accidentally be hit. I am sure I did not have
this problem when I was playing around with Ubuntu 32-bit I386 on my
2004 vintage machine.
Stan

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Posted by: Stan Gorodenski <stanlep@commspeed.net>
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Re: [LINUX_Newbies] A PC

 

Last night I downloaded amd64 and installed it on the new pc. I had no
problems at all. In retrospect, the keyboard lock up problem I had may
have been the result of trying to install an old version of 32-bit
ubuntu, version 14. It may be this old version could not recognize some
things in the newer pc's and the keyboards. For example, during the
install with amd64 the message "Fast TCS Calibration Failed", indicating
a monitor problem, never came up. The reason I was using the old ver 14
is because that was the version I downloaded to install on my 2004
vintage tower case. I never intended to have the final web site on this
machine. I put it on this machine just to learn a little about Ubuntu.
Last year I had downloaded version 14 because the newer version, ver 16
32-bit, was too large to fit on my CD disk. I did not know at the time I
could have used a thumb drive in a USB port.

It is odd that in amd64 the sudo aptitude command is not recognized. Now
it is apt. One would have thought the developers of Ubuntu would have
kept the old along with the new.
Stan

On 5/20/2017 4:37 PM, J dreadpiratejeff@gmail.com [LINUX_Newbies] wrote:
> On Sat, May 20, 2017 at 11:52 AM, Stan Gorodenski
> stanlep@commspeed.net [LINUX_Newbies]<LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com>
> wrote:
>
>>> amd64 is for 64bit. Give it a whirl. Typically, the sort of problems
>>> you're describing are memory issues (either bad RAM, or it could well
>>> be that 32bit is being flaky on a system with 8GB). Also remember
>>> though, you're running this off a USB stick, IN MEMORY, until you
>>> install it. That means if you're using USB 2.0, it'll be really slow,
>>> seem to hang or freeze and be generally annoying. And sounds like you
>>> were using the desktop version of 32bit anyway, so it's possible that
>>> what you were experiencing was due to video drivers or something along
>>> those lines. The Server Install is NON-GUI, so just keep that in
>>> mind. You can install the desktop on top of Ubuntu Server, but Server
>>> does not include it by default (it's not even on the ISO image).
>>>
>>>
>> It is running off a CD disk that I burned the 32-bit Ubuntu server
>> install on (Ubuntu server, not desktop). The CD has a 700 MB capacity
>> and runs at a max of 52x speed. It is running in the optical disk drive
>> part of the machine. I assume the drive also accepts CD's in addtion to
>> DVD's. I'll check with a Geek I have an appointment with to see this
>> morning to make sure there is no problem running the CD in this optical
>> drive. Does this help target the problem any?
>>
> Yeah, that will make it a lot slower if it has to read off the disk,
> but it still loads a significant portion of everything into RAM first.
> That said, it's always easier to use USB sticks for the install,
> they're faster and the ISO images don't always adhere to 700MB limit
> for CDs, especially for Desktop.
>
>

__._,_.___

Posted by: Stan Gorodenski <stanlep@commspeed.net>
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Saturday, May 20, 2017

Re: [LINUX_Newbies] A PC

 

On Sat, May 20, 2017 at 11:52 AM, Stan Gorodenski
stanlep@commspeed.net [LINUX_Newbies] <LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com>
wrote:
>> amd64 is for 64bit. Give it a whirl. Typically, the sort of problems
>> you're describing are memory issues (either bad RAM, or it could well
>> be that 32bit is being flaky on a system with 8GB). Also remember
>> though, you're running this off a USB stick, IN MEMORY, until you
>> install it. That means if you're using USB 2.0, it'll be really slow,
>> seem to hang or freeze and be generally annoying. And sounds like you
>> were using the desktop version of 32bit anyway, so it's possible that
>> what you were experiencing was due to video drivers or something along
>> those lines. The Server Install is NON-GUI, so just keep that in
>> mind. You can install the desktop on top of Ubuntu Server, but Server
>> does not include it by default (it's not even on the ISO image).
>>
>
> It is running off a CD disk that I burned the 32-bit Ubuntu server
> install on (Ubuntu server, not desktop). The CD has a 700 MB capacity
> and runs at a max of 52x speed. It is running in the optical disk drive
> part of the machine. I assume the drive also accepts CD's in addtion to
> DVD's. I'll check with a Geek I have an appointment with to see this
> morning to make sure there is no problem running the CD in this optical
> drive. Does this help target the problem any?

Yeah, that will make it a lot slower if it has to read off the disk,
but it still loads a significant portion of everything into RAM first.
That said, it's always easier to use USB sticks for the install,
they're faster and the ISO images don't always adhere to 700MB limit
for CDs, especially for Desktop.

__._,_.___

Posted by: J <dreadpiratejeff@gmail.com>
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.

__,_._,___

Re: [LINUX_Newbies] A PC

 



On 5/20/2017 9:33 AM, Stan Gorodenski stanlep@commspeed.net
[LINUX_Newbies] wrote:
>
> p.s., Jeff. Here is another diagnostic that just occurred to me that
> might point to the problem. When I try to install the 32-bit Ubuntu
> Server the first screen that pops up is the language choice screen. It
> is automatically set on English and so I just press the Enter key. The
> next screen that comes up says 'Install Ubuntu Server'. I hit the Enter
> key and it takes about 15-20 seconds before anything happens. When
> something does happen, the first thing that comes up is a message that
> very quickly disappears. It says "Fast TSC Calibration Failed". Then it
> proceeds with the normal install.
> Stan
>

I just got back from Best Buy and found out the "Fast TSC Calibration
Failed" message is a monitor message. I am using a 2005 vintage Gateway
monitor I bought at Goodwill. However, this monitor is not related to
the keyboard freeze problem I am having because their keyboard also
froze at the screen where the network is selected and they have current
vintage monitor.
Stan

>
> On 5/20/2017 8:52 AM, Stan Gorodenski stanlep@commspeed.net
> [LINUX_Newbies] wrote:
> >
> > Thanks, Jeff. Comment below:
> >
> > On 5/20/2017 2:08 AM, J dreadpiratejeff@gmail.com [LINUX_Newbies] wrote:
> > >
> > > On Sat, May 20, 2017 at 12:37 AM, Stan Gorodenski
> > > stanlep@commspeed.net [LINUX_Newbies] <LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com>
> > > wrote:
> > > > Scott, Jeff, and All,
> > > > I didn't get the Lenovo machine I was talking about. Best Buy had
> > a Dell
> > > > desktop with an i3 7th gen processor, 8G RAM, and 1T hard drive on
> > sale
> > > > for $349 plus tax.
> > >
> > > That's not a bad price at all.
> > >
> > > > In trying to install Ubuntu, the keyboard would unpredictably
> > freeze up.
> > > > It would freeze up where I would select the network (wifi or
> > cable) and
> > > > then sometimes it would not. It would freeze up where I would
> > backspace
> > > > to enter my user name, and sometimes it would not.
> > > >
> > > > This is a 64-bit machine, but I am trying to install Ubuntu
> configured
> > > > for a 32-bit machine. The Geek at Best Buy said 32-bit Ubuntu will
> > work
> > > > okay on the 64-bit machine, but maybe installing a 32-bit
> instead of a
> > > > 64-bit Ubuntu is the cause of the keyboard freezing up. (the
> > reason I am
> > > > installing 32-bit is because that is what I had downloaded months
> > ago to
> > > > play with Ubuntu on my old desktop that is 32-bit).
> > > >
> > > > I called Best Buy again and talked to another Geek at the Geek
> Squad.
> > > > This one said he would not recommend installing 32-bit on a 64-bit
> > > > machine and that may be the reason why the keyboard sometimes
> freezes
> > > > up. So, I went to Ubuntu's website of free downloads
> > > > http://releases.ubuntu.com/16.04.2/
> > >
> > > I have snarky comments about Geek Squad employees, but I'll hold them
> > > back and leave it to your imagination ;)
> > >
> > > > I do not see a download for a server operating system for an i3
> 64-bit
> > > > machine. I see server OS for a 64-bit AMD machine, but not for
> an i3.
> > > > Should I return the pc and get a machine with a 64-bit AMD
> processor?
> > > > Could there be a problem with the pc that is causing the keyboard to
> > > > freeze up? It would do it with the keyboard that came with the
> machine
> > > > and an old Dell keyboard I have. I tried unplugging the key
> board and
> > > > putting it back in the USB port but that had no effect.
> > >
> > > amd64 is for 64bit. Give it a whirl. Typically, the sort of problems
> > > you're describing are memory issues (either bad RAM, or it could well
> > > be that 32bit is being flaky on a system with 8GB). Also remember
> > > though, you're running this off a USB stick, IN MEMORY, until you
> > > install it. That means if you're using USB 2.0, it'll be really slow,
> > > seem to hang or freeze and be generally annoying. And sounds like you
> > > were using the desktop version of 32bit anyway, so it's possible that
> > > what you were experiencing was due to video drivers or something along
> > > those lines. The Server Install is NON-GUI, so just keep that in
> > > mind. You can install the desktop on top of Ubuntu Server, but Server
> > > does not include it by default (it's not even on the ISO image).
> > >
> >
> > It is running off a CD disk that I burned the 32-bit Ubuntu server
> > install on (Ubuntu server, not desktop). The CD has a 700 MB capacity
> > and runs at a max of 52x speed. It is running in the optical disk drive
> > part of the machine. I assume the drive also accepts CD's in addtion to
> > DVD's. I'll check with a Geek I have an appointment with to see this
> > morning to make sure there is no problem running the CD in this optical
> > drive. Does this help target the problem any?
> > Stan
> >
> > >
> > > Here's a bit of history. In the (much more recent) beginning, there
> > > was 32bit, ia32, x86, however you wish to call it. RAM was expensive,
> > > and no one could possibly have afforded more than 4GB, so 32bit x86
> > > was the defacto standard among the PC world. Then RAM prices dropped
> > > and companies like SGI and Sun and HP and DEC/Alpha started putting
> > > smaller versions of 64-bit CPUs in their high end workstations and
> > > such, because now people could afford more RAM and 32-bit simply
> > > couldn't provide enough registers to address more than 4GB. Soon
> > > after that, AMD came out with their 64-bit extensions to the ia32
> > > architecture and called it amd64. Intel very shortly afterwards came
> > > out with their own version called EM6T. The two had similar, but
> > > different, instruction sets, and early on, compilers could only
> > > compile binaries for one or the other, so you'd see operating systems
> > > and software compiled for both.
> > >
> > > Eventually, compilers progressed to the point where separate binaries
> > > were no longer necessary and now there's just "x86_64" or "amd64"
> > > binaries that work on both Intel and AMD 64-bit CPUs. The real
> > > differences between the two implementations are pretty small, and
> > > technically, the 64-bit Intel CPUs are still EM64T CPUs, it's just
> > > that everything is called x86_64 generically, or amd64, which I'm sure
> > > Intel just loves.
> > >
> > > So these days there are simply 64-bit and 32-bit Linuxes. Ubuntu
> > > calls it amd64, Red Hat and SuSE use x86_64, IIRC (they did back when
> > > I worked with those daily), but they're the same thing.
> > >
> > > 32-bit can only address about 3.7GB of RAM. If the CPU includes PAE
> > > (Physical Address Extension) code (all modern 32-bit AMD and Intel
> > > CPUs do, I believe), then it'll support as much as an amd64/em64t CPU.
> > > Personally, I always found PAE a bit dodgy. It worked fine, I guess,
> > > but early on it was REALLY dodgy, so I grew up mistrusting it as Black
> > > Magic. These days, once you have more than 4GB of memory, there's no
> > > reason not to use a 64bit OS. Time was, you'd use 32bit because most
> > > all the applications were compiled for 32-bit only, but now just about
> > > everything is compiled for both anyway (anything you're likely going
> > > to want is going to be compiled for both in any case).
> > >
> > > Also, just for funsies, there was discussion last year about dropping
> > > 32-bit in Ubuntu by 18.04. Who knows... time will tell.
> > >
> > > Finally, if you ever want to play with classics, the OLDER Ubuntu
> > > releases, can be found at http://old-releases.ubuntu.com/, all the way
> > > back to Warty Warthog (4.10).
> > >
> > > The real question is... why the heck am I still awake at 5 AM?
> > >
> > > > Stan
> > > >
> > > >
> > > >
> > > >
> > > > On 5/9/2017 10:13 AM, Scott scottro@nyc.rr.com [LINUX_Newbies]
> wrote:
> > > >> On Tue, May 09, 2017 at 09:50:21AM -0700, Stan Gorodenski
> > > stanlep@commspeed.net [LINUX_Newbies] wrote:
> > > >>
> > > >>> Thank you, Jeff. Questions inserted below.
> > > >>>
> > > >>> On 5/9/2017 7:28 AM, J dreadpiratejeff@gmail.com [LINUX_Newbies]
> > > wrote:
> > > >>>
> > > >>>>
> > > >>>>> Would this be sufficient for a web/file server, possibly a
> > > discussion
> > > >>>>> group in the future? It seems I remember reading some where
> that a
> > > >>>>> server should have at least 8G ram. It can be increased to 8G on
> > > this
> > > >>>>> machine but it has only one slot and so I would have to spend
> > > another
> > > >>>>> $50 or so for another memory card.
> > > >>>>> Stan
> > > >>>>>
> > > >>>> For what you described, this is probably more than enough for
> > > your use
> > > >>>> case. The only upgrade I may consider, given the parameters you
> > > >>>> describe, would be a pair of 2TB or larger HDDs and set up as a
> > > >>>> software raid mirror to provide a modicum of local redundancy.
> > > >>>>
> > > >>>>
> > > >>> The machine comes with 4G ram. Should I upgrade to 8G?
> > > >>> The machine comes with a 0.5TB hard drive. I am uncertain what the
> > > >>> advantage of a pair of 2TB HDDs is. Could you elaborate some?
> > > >>>
> > > >> Not that I presume to speak for Jeff, but he's saying that it's
> > > probably not
> > > >> necessary to upgrade the RAM. If you thought it was going to be a
> > > heavily
> > > >> loaded server, then it might be worth
> > > >> considering, but from what you describe, 4G should be adequate.
> > > >>
> > > >> Jeff is suggesting setting up RAID so that if one drive died, you
> > could
> > > >> replace it. That being said, if you're not expecting to have a lot
> > > of data,
> > > >> you may not need 2 TB. However, it would give you a bit of leeway
> > > if your
> > > >> content expanded. He's saying 2 drives so that you could create a
> > > RAID-1
> > > >> mirror, meaning that if one drive dies, you still have the second
> > > >> one running.
> > > >>
> > > >>
> > > >>
> > > >
> > > >
> > > >
> > > > ------------------------------------
> > > > Posted by: Stan Gorodenski <stanlep@commspeed.net>
> > > > ------------------------------------
> > > >
> > > > To unsubscribe from this list, please email
> > > LINUX_Newbies-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com & you will be removed.
> > > > ------------------------------------
> > > >
> > > > Yahoo Groups Links
> > > >
> > > >
> > > >
> > >
> > >
> >
> >
>
>

__._,_.___

Posted by: Stan Gorodenski <stanlep@commspeed.net>
Reply via web post Reply to sender Reply to group Start a New Topic Messages in this topic (11)

Have you tried the highest rated email app?
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__,_._,___

Re: [LINUX_Newbies] A PC

 

p.s., Jeff. Here is another diagnostic that just occurred to me that
might point to the problem. When I try to install the 32-bit Ubuntu
Server the first screen that pops up is the language choice screen. It
is automatically set on English and so I just press the Enter key. The
next screen that comes up says 'Install Ubuntu Server'. I hit the Enter
key and it takes about 15-20 seconds before anything happens. When
something does happen, the first thing that comes up is a message that
very quickly disappears. It says "Fast TSC Calibration Failed". Then it
proceeds with the normal install.
Stan

On 5/20/2017 8:52 AM, Stan Gorodenski stanlep@commspeed.net
[LINUX_Newbies] wrote:
>
> Thanks, Jeff. Comment below:
>
> On 5/20/2017 2:08 AM, J dreadpiratejeff@gmail.com [LINUX_Newbies] wrote:
> >
> > On Sat, May 20, 2017 at 12:37 AM, Stan Gorodenski
> > stanlep@commspeed.net [LINUX_Newbies] <LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com>
> > wrote:
> > > Scott, Jeff, and All,
> > > I didn't get the Lenovo machine I was talking about. Best Buy had
> a Dell
> > > desktop with an i3 7th gen processor, 8G RAM, and 1T hard drive on
> sale
> > > for $349 plus tax.
> >
> > That's not a bad price at all.
> >
> > > In trying to install Ubuntu, the keyboard would unpredictably
> freeze up.
> > > It would freeze up where I would select the network (wifi or
> cable) and
> > > then sometimes it would not. It would freeze up where I would
> backspace
> > > to enter my user name, and sometimes it would not.
> > >
> > > This is a 64-bit machine, but I am trying to install Ubuntu configured
> > > for a 32-bit machine. The Geek at Best Buy said 32-bit Ubuntu will
> work
> > > okay on the 64-bit machine, but maybe installing a 32-bit instead of a
> > > 64-bit Ubuntu is the cause of the keyboard freezing up. (the
> reason I am
> > > installing 32-bit is because that is what I had downloaded months
> ago to
> > > play with Ubuntu on my old desktop that is 32-bit).
> > >
> > > I called Best Buy again and talked to another Geek at the Geek Squad.
> > > This one said he would not recommend installing 32-bit on a 64-bit
> > > machine and that may be the reason why the keyboard sometimes freezes
> > > up. So, I went to Ubuntu's website of free downloads
> > > http://releases.ubuntu.com/16.04.2/
> >
> > I have snarky comments about Geek Squad employees, but I'll hold them
> > back and leave it to your imagination ;)
> >
> > > I do not see a download for a server operating system for an i3 64-bit
> > > machine. I see server OS for a 64-bit AMD machine, but not for an i3.
> > > Should I return the pc and get a machine with a 64-bit AMD processor?
> > > Could there be a problem with the pc that is causing the keyboard to
> > > freeze up? It would do it with the keyboard that came with the machine
> > > and an old Dell keyboard I have. I tried unplugging the key board and
> > > putting it back in the USB port but that had no effect.
> >
> > amd64 is for 64bit. Give it a whirl. Typically, the sort of problems
> > you're describing are memory issues (either bad RAM, or it could well
> > be that 32bit is being flaky on a system with 8GB). Also remember
> > though, you're running this off a USB stick, IN MEMORY, until you
> > install it. That means if you're using USB 2.0, it'll be really slow,
> > seem to hang or freeze and be generally annoying. And sounds like you
> > were using the desktop version of 32bit anyway, so it's possible that
> > what you were experiencing was due to video drivers or something along
> > those lines. The Server Install is NON-GUI, so just keep that in
> > mind. You can install the desktop on top of Ubuntu Server, but Server
> > does not include it by default (it's not even on the ISO image).
> >
>
> It is running off a CD disk that I burned the 32-bit Ubuntu server
> install on (Ubuntu server, not desktop). The CD has a 700 MB capacity
> and runs at a max of 52x speed. It is running in the optical disk drive
> part of the machine. I assume the drive also accepts CD's in addtion to
> DVD's. I'll check with a Geek I have an appointment with to see this
> morning to make sure there is no problem running the CD in this optical
> drive. Does this help target the problem any?
> Stan
>
> >
> > Here's a bit of history. In the (much more recent) beginning, there
> > was 32bit, ia32, x86, however you wish to call it. RAM was expensive,
> > and no one could possibly have afforded more than 4GB, so 32bit x86
> > was the defacto standard among the PC world. Then RAM prices dropped
> > and companies like SGI and Sun and HP and DEC/Alpha started putting
> > smaller versions of 64-bit CPUs in their high end workstations and
> > such, because now people could afford more RAM and 32-bit simply
> > couldn't provide enough registers to address more than 4GB. Soon
> > after that, AMD came out with their 64-bit extensions to the ia32
> > architecture and called it amd64. Intel very shortly afterwards came
> > out with their own version called EM6T. The two had similar, but
> > different, instruction sets, and early on, compilers could only
> > compile binaries for one or the other, so you'd see operating systems
> > and software compiled for both.
> >
> > Eventually, compilers progressed to the point where separate binaries
> > were no longer necessary and now there's just "x86_64" or "amd64"
> > binaries that work on both Intel and AMD 64-bit CPUs. The real
> > differences between the two implementations are pretty small, and
> > technically, the 64-bit Intel CPUs are still EM64T CPUs, it's just
> > that everything is called x86_64 generically, or amd64, which I'm sure
> > Intel just loves.
> >
> > So these days there are simply 64-bit and 32-bit Linuxes. Ubuntu
> > calls it amd64, Red Hat and SuSE use x86_64, IIRC (they did back when
> > I worked with those daily), but they're the same thing.
> >
> > 32-bit can only address about 3.7GB of RAM. If the CPU includes PAE
> > (Physical Address Extension) code (all modern 32-bit AMD and Intel
> > CPUs do, I believe), then it'll support as much as an amd64/em64t CPU.
> > Personally, I always found PAE a bit dodgy. It worked fine, I guess,
> > but early on it was REALLY dodgy, so I grew up mistrusting it as Black
> > Magic. These days, once you have more than 4GB of memory, there's no
> > reason not to use a 64bit OS. Time was, you'd use 32bit because most
> > all the applications were compiled for 32-bit only, but now just about
> > everything is compiled for both anyway (anything you're likely going
> > to want is going to be compiled for both in any case).
> >
> > Also, just for funsies, there was discussion last year about dropping
> > 32-bit in Ubuntu by 18.04. Who knows... time will tell.
> >
> > Finally, if you ever want to play with classics, the OLDER Ubuntu
> > releases, can be found at http://old-releases.ubuntu.com/, all the way
> > back to Warty Warthog (4.10).
> >
> > The real question is... why the heck am I still awake at 5 AM?
> >
> > > Stan
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > On 5/9/2017 10:13 AM, Scott scottro@nyc.rr.com [LINUX_Newbies] wrote:
> > >> On Tue, May 09, 2017 at 09:50:21AM -0700, Stan Gorodenski
> > stanlep@commspeed.net [LINUX_Newbies] wrote:
> > >>
> > >>> Thank you, Jeff. Questions inserted below.
> > >>>
> > >>> On 5/9/2017 7:28 AM, J dreadpiratejeff@gmail.com [LINUX_Newbies]
> > wrote:
> > >>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>>> Would this be sufficient for a web/file server, possibly a
> > discussion
> > >>>>> group in the future? It seems I remember reading some where that a
> > >>>>> server should have at least 8G ram. It can be increased to 8G on
> > this
> > >>>>> machine but it has only one slot and so I would have to spend
> > another
> > >>>>> $50 or so for another memory card.
> > >>>>> Stan
> > >>>>>
> > >>>> For what you described, this is probably more than enough for
> > your use
> > >>>> case. The only upgrade I may consider, given the parameters you
> > >>>> describe, would be a pair of 2TB or larger HDDs and set up as a
> > >>>> software raid mirror to provide a modicum of local redundancy.
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>> The machine comes with 4G ram. Should I upgrade to 8G?
> > >>> The machine comes with a 0.5TB hard drive. I am uncertain what the
> > >>> advantage of a pair of 2TB HDDs is. Could you elaborate some?
> > >>>
> > >> Not that I presume to speak for Jeff, but he's saying that it's
> > probably not
> > >> necessary to upgrade the RAM. If you thought it was going to be a
> > heavily
> > >> loaded server, then it might be worth
> > >> considering, but from what you describe, 4G should be adequate.
> > >>
> > >> Jeff is suggesting setting up RAID so that if one drive died, you
> could
> > >> replace it. That being said, if you're not expecting to have a lot
> > of data,
> > >> you may not need 2 TB. However, it would give you a bit of leeway
> > if your
> > >> content expanded. He's saying 2 drives so that you could create a
> > RAID-1
> > >> mirror, meaning that if one drive dies, you still have the second
> > >> one running.
> > >>
> > >>
> > >>
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > ------------------------------------
> > > Posted by: Stan Gorodenski <stanlep@commspeed.net>
> > > ------------------------------------
> > >
> > > To unsubscribe from this list, please email
> > LINUX_Newbies-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com & you will be removed.
> > > ------------------------------------
> > >
> > > Yahoo Groups Links
> > >
> > >
> > >
> >
> >
>
>

__._,_.___

Posted by: Stan Gorodenski <stanlep@commspeed.net>
Reply via web post Reply to sender Reply to group Start a New Topic Messages in this topic (10)

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Re: [LINUX_Newbies] A PC

 

Thanks, Jeff. Comment below:

On 5/20/2017 2:08 AM, J dreadpiratejeff@gmail.com [LINUX_Newbies] wrote:
>
> On Sat, May 20, 2017 at 12:37 AM, Stan Gorodenski
> stanlep@commspeed.net [LINUX_Newbies] <LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com>
> wrote:
> > Scott, Jeff, and All,
> > I didn't get the Lenovo machine I was talking about. Best Buy had a Dell
> > desktop with an i3 7th gen processor, 8G RAM, and 1T hard drive on sale
> > for $349 plus tax.
>
> That's not a bad price at all.
>
> > In trying to install Ubuntu, the keyboard would unpredictably freeze up.
> > It would freeze up where I would select the network (wifi or cable) and
> > then sometimes it would not. It would freeze up where I would backspace
> > to enter my user name, and sometimes it would not.
> >
> > This is a 64-bit machine, but I am trying to install Ubuntu configured
> > for a 32-bit machine. The Geek at Best Buy said 32-bit Ubuntu will work
> > okay on the 64-bit machine, but maybe installing a 32-bit instead of a
> > 64-bit Ubuntu is the cause of the keyboard freezing up. (the reason I am
> > installing 32-bit is because that is what I had downloaded months ago to
> > play with Ubuntu on my old desktop that is 32-bit).
> >
> > I called Best Buy again and talked to another Geek at the Geek Squad.
> > This one said he would not recommend installing 32-bit on a 64-bit
> > machine and that may be the reason why the keyboard sometimes freezes
> > up. So, I went to Ubuntu's website of free downloads
> > http://releases.ubuntu.com/16.04.2/
>
> I have snarky comments about Geek Squad employees, but I'll hold them
> back and leave it to your imagination ;)
>
> > I do not see a download for a server operating system for an i3 64-bit
> > machine. I see server OS for a 64-bit AMD machine, but not for an i3.
> > Should I return the pc and get a machine with a 64-bit AMD processor?
> > Could there be a problem with the pc that is causing the keyboard to
> > freeze up? It would do it with the keyboard that came with the machine
> > and an old Dell keyboard I have. I tried unplugging the key board and
> > putting it back in the USB port but that had no effect.
>
> amd64 is for 64bit. Give it a whirl. Typically, the sort of problems
> you're describing are memory issues (either bad RAM, or it could well
> be that 32bit is being flaky on a system with 8GB). Also remember
> though, you're running this off a USB stick, IN MEMORY, until you
> install it. That means if you're using USB 2.0, it'll be really slow,
> seem to hang or freeze and be generally annoying. And sounds like you
> were using the desktop version of 32bit anyway, so it's possible that
> what you were experiencing was due to video drivers or something along
> those lines. The Server Install is NON-GUI, so just keep that in
> mind. You can install the desktop on top of Ubuntu Server, but Server
> does not include it by default (it's not even on the ISO image).
>

It is running off a CD disk that I burned the 32-bit Ubuntu server
install on (Ubuntu server, not desktop). The CD has a 700 MB capacity
and runs at a max of 52x speed. It is running in the optical disk drive
part of the machine. I assume the drive also accepts CD's in addtion to
DVD's. I'll check with a Geek I have an appointment with to see this
morning to make sure there is no problem running the CD in this optical
drive. Does this help target the problem any?
Stan

>
> Here's a bit of history. In the (much more recent) beginning, there
> was 32bit, ia32, x86, however you wish to call it. RAM was expensive,
> and no one could possibly have afforded more than 4GB, so 32bit x86
> was the defacto standard among the PC world. Then RAM prices dropped
> and companies like SGI and Sun and HP and DEC/Alpha started putting
> smaller versions of 64-bit CPUs in their high end workstations and
> such, because now people could afford more RAM and 32-bit simply
> couldn't provide enough registers to address more than 4GB. Soon
> after that, AMD came out with their 64-bit extensions to the ia32
> architecture and called it amd64. Intel very shortly afterwards came
> out with their own version called EM6T. The two had similar, but
> different, instruction sets, and early on, compilers could only
> compile binaries for one or the other, so you'd see operating systems
> and software compiled for both.
>
> Eventually, compilers progressed to the point where separate binaries
> were no longer necessary and now there's just "x86_64" or "amd64"
> binaries that work on both Intel and AMD 64-bit CPUs. The real
> differences between the two implementations are pretty small, and
> technically, the 64-bit Intel CPUs are still EM64T CPUs, it's just
> that everything is called x86_64 generically, or amd64, which I'm sure
> Intel just loves.
>
> So these days there are simply 64-bit and 32-bit Linuxes. Ubuntu
> calls it amd64, Red Hat and SuSE use x86_64, IIRC (they did back when
> I worked with those daily), but they're the same thing.
>
> 32-bit can only address about 3.7GB of RAM. If the CPU includes PAE
> (Physical Address Extension) code (all modern 32-bit AMD and Intel
> CPUs do, I believe), then it'll support as much as an amd64/em64t CPU.
> Personally, I always found PAE a bit dodgy. It worked fine, I guess,
> but early on it was REALLY dodgy, so I grew up mistrusting it as Black
> Magic. These days, once you have more than 4GB of memory, there's no
> reason not to use a 64bit OS. Time was, you'd use 32bit because most
> all the applications were compiled for 32-bit only, but now just about
> everything is compiled for both anyway (anything you're likely going
> to want is going to be compiled for both in any case).
>
> Also, just for funsies, there was discussion last year about dropping
> 32-bit in Ubuntu by 18.04. Who knows... time will tell.
>
> Finally, if you ever want to play with classics, the OLDER Ubuntu
> releases, can be found at http://old-releases.ubuntu.com/, all the way
> back to Warty Warthog (4.10).
>
> The real question is... why the heck am I still awake at 5 AM?
>
> > Stan
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > On 5/9/2017 10:13 AM, Scott scottro@nyc.rr.com [LINUX_Newbies] wrote:
> >> On Tue, May 09, 2017 at 09:50:21AM -0700, Stan Gorodenski
> stanlep@commspeed.net [LINUX_Newbies] wrote:
> >>
> >>> Thank you, Jeff. Questions inserted below.
> >>>
> >>> On 5/9/2017 7:28 AM, J dreadpiratejeff@gmail.com [LINUX_Newbies]
> wrote:
> >>>
> >>>>
> >>>>> Would this be sufficient for a web/file server, possibly a
> discussion
> >>>>> group in the future? It seems I remember reading some where that a
> >>>>> server should have at least 8G ram. It can be increased to 8G on
> this
> >>>>> machine but it has only one slot and so I would have to spend
> another
> >>>>> $50 or so for another memory card.
> >>>>> Stan
> >>>>>
> >>>> For what you described, this is probably more than enough for
> your use
> >>>> case. The only upgrade I may consider, given the parameters you
> >>>> describe, would be a pair of 2TB or larger HDDs and set up as a
> >>>> software raid mirror to provide a modicum of local redundancy.
> >>>>
> >>>>
> >>> The machine comes with 4G ram. Should I upgrade to 8G?
> >>> The machine comes with a 0.5TB hard drive. I am uncertain what the
> >>> advantage of a pair of 2TB HDDs is. Could you elaborate some?
> >>>
> >> Not that I presume to speak for Jeff, but he's saying that it's
> probably not
> >> necessary to upgrade the RAM. If you thought it was going to be a
> heavily
> >> loaded server, then it might be worth
> >> considering, but from what you describe, 4G should be adequate.
> >>
> >> Jeff is suggesting setting up RAID so that if one drive died, you could
> >> replace it. That being said, if you're not expecting to have a lot
> of data,
> >> you may not need 2 TB. However, it would give you a bit of leeway
> if your
> >> content expanded. He's saying 2 drives so that you could create a
> RAID-1
> >> mirror, meaning that if one drive dies, you still have the second
> >> one running.
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >
> >
> >
> > ------------------------------------
> > Posted by: Stan Gorodenski <stanlep@commspeed.net>
> > ------------------------------------
> >
> > To unsubscribe from this list, please email
> LINUX_Newbies-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com & you will be removed.
> > ------------------------------------
> >
> > Yahoo Groups Links
> >
> >
> >
>
>

__._,_.___

Posted by: Stan Gorodenski <stanlep@commspeed.net>
Reply via web post Reply to sender Reply to group Start a New Topic Messages in this topic (9)

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Re: [LINUX_Newbies] A PC

 

My suggestion would be to try Antergos - https://antergos.com/

Use the x64 version and I bet it will work perfectly.

Arch is a little bit of learning curve over Ubuntu but it really is a superior distro.

I have found it detects and installs all new hardware that I could not get working before with Fedora, CentOS, Ubuntu or other distributions. (I had some very microsoft specific hardware that just WOULD not work until I moves to Antergos)

Let me know how it goes!

- Tad

On Fri, May 19, 2017 at 10:37 PM, Stan Gorodenski stanlep@commspeed.net [LINUX_Newbies] <LINUX_Newbies@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
 

Scott, Jeff, and All,
I didn't get the Lenovo machine I was talking about. Best Buy had a Dell
desktop with an i3 7th gen processor, 8G RAM, and 1T hard drive on sale
for $349 plus tax.

In trying to install Ubuntu, the keyboard would unpredictably freeze up.
It would freeze up where I would select the network (wifi or cable) and
then sometimes it would not. It would freeze up where I would backspace
to enter my user name, and sometimes it would not.

This is a 64-bit machine, but I am trying to install Ubuntu configured
for a 32-bit machine. The Geek at Best Buy said 32-bit Ubuntu will work
okay on the 64-bit machine, but maybe installing a 32-bit instead of a
64-bit Ubuntu is the cause of the keyboard freezing up. (the reason I am
installing 32-bit is because that is what I had downloaded months ago to
play with Ubuntu on my old desktop that is 32-bit).

I called Best Buy again and talked to another Geek at the Geek Squad.
This one said he would not recommend installing 32-bit on a 64-bit
machine and that may be the reason why the keyboard sometimes freezes
up. So, I went to Ubuntu's website of free downloads
http://releases.ubuntu.com/16.04.2/
I do not see a download for a server operating system for an i3 64-bit
machine. I see server OS for a 64-bit AMD machine, but not for an i3.
Should I return the pc and get a machine with a 64-bit AMD processor?
Could there be a problem with the pc that is causing the keyboard to
freeze up? It would do it with the keyboard that came with the machine
and an old Dell keyboard I have. I tried unplugging the key board and
putting it back in the USB port but that had no effect.
Stan

On 5/9/2017 10:13 AM, Scott scottro@nyc.rr.com [LINUX_Newbies] wrote:
> On Tue, May 09, 2017 at 09:50:21AM -0700, Stan Gorodenski stanlep@commspeed.net [LINUX_Newbies] wrote:
>
>> Thank you, Jeff. Questions inserted below.
>>
>> On 5/9/2017 7:28 AM, J dreadpiratejeff@gmail.com [LINUX_Newbies] wrote:
>>
>>>
>>>> Would this be sufficient for a web/file server, possibly a discussion
>>>> group in the future? It seems I remember reading some where that a
>>>> server should have at least 8G ram. It can be increased to 8G on this
>>>> machine but it has only one slot and so I would have to spend another
>>>> $50 or so for another memory card.
>>>> Stan
>>>>
>>> For what you described, this is probably more than enough for your use
>>> case. The only upgrade I may consider, given the parameters you
>>> describe, would be a pair of 2TB or larger HDDs and set up as a
>>> software raid mirror to provide a modicum of local redundancy.
>>>
>>>
>> The machine comes with 4G ram. Should I upgrade to 8G?
>> The machine comes with a 0.5TB hard drive. I am uncertain what the
>> advantage of a pair of 2TB HDDs is. Could you elaborate some?
>>
> Not that I presume to speak for Jeff, but he's saying that it's probably not
> necessary to upgrade the RAM. If you thought it was going to be a heavily
> loaded server, then it might be worth
> considering, but from what you describe, 4G should be adequate.
>
> Jeff is suggesting setting up RAID so that if one drive died, you could
> replace it. That being said, if you're not expecting to have a lot of data,
> you may not need 2 TB. However, it would give you a bit of leeway if your
> content expanded. He's saying 2 drives so that you could create a RAID-1
> mirror, meaning that if one drive dies, you still have the second
> one running.
>
>
>


__._,_.___

Posted by: Tad Brooker <tad@thebrookers.com>
Reply via web post Reply to sender Reply to group Start a New Topic Messages in this topic (8)

Have you tried the highest rated email app?
With 4.5 stars in iTunes, the Yahoo Mail app is the highest rated email app on the market. What are you waiting for? Now you can access all your inboxes (Gmail, Outlook, AOL and more) in one place. Never delete an email again with 1000GB of free cloud storage.

To unsubscribe from this list, please email LINUX_Newbies-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com & you will be removed.

.

__,_._,___